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Intersection of Disability & Race Explored at Free, DEI Virtual Conference: Civil Rights Advocate Kimberlé W. Crenshaw & Disability Activists to Present

BROOKVILLE, N.Y. – As issues at the intersection of disability and race remain under-recognized due to a lack fluency or awareness, nonprofit agencies AHRC Nassau and The Arc of the United States are responding with a free, online conference on Wednesday, May 18, 2022 to connect attendees of all abilities and backgrounds with research, best practices, and most importantly, with each other.

The Diversity, Equity & Inclusion (DEI) Virtual Conference, “Beyond the Comfort Zone: Understanding and Eradicating Injustice, Racism and Inequality in the Field of Developmental Disabilities,” will explore the history, the latest research, and opportunities for the increased inclusion of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) as well as recognition for direct care staff, who are primarily Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC).

“Disability is an underdeveloped area of DEI. For those with no prior connection to the experience of disability or the underlying issues related to race, there can be shame and hesitation in trying to discuss these issues—or worse, silence,” said Stanfort J. Perry, Conference Chair and CEO of AHRC Nassau. “The purpose of this online conference is to create a platform offering the latest insight on the intersectionality of issues pertaining to ableism and racism—to encourage questions, conversations, and above all, shine a spotlight on those whom society has marginalized.”

More than 30 years since the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, people with disabilities remain one of the most marginalized groups – at high risk of violent crimes to contracting and dying from COVID-19. Their essential support staff, who make tasks of daily living and participation in the wider community possible, are predominantly women of color who have spent years advocating for a living wage. According to a report from the University of Minnesota – Institute on Community Integration and The National Alliance for Direct Support Professionals, “Black/African American Direct Support Professionals (DSPs) were paid less per hour than white DSPs, and a higher percentage of Black/African American DSPs worked 40 or more additional hours per week.”

Though there is overwhelming need, an overall lack of funding has resulted in a 43% national turnover rate in the direct care workforce and a staffing crisis. Self-advocates, like Jessica Campbell, have advocated for years for necessary funding to ensure services and supports to lead an independent life. “Imagine not being able to get medication, access money, stay clean, cook, do your job, or go out into the community—that’s what a staffing crisis means to us,” said Campbell, who is currently a member of AHRC Nassau’s Board of Directors and a Field Assistant for the Long Island Region at the Self-Advocacy Association of New York State.

The upcoming DEI Virtual Conference is important to Campbell because in addition to addressing some of these issues during a conference panel, she hopes “more people have a chance to be understood and that more people can begin to understand the experience of disability.”

For Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc of the United States, “Disability providers, at the state and federal level, are working within legal, legislative, and service frameworks that can be complex and difficult to navigate regardless of whether you receive services, work in the industry, or seek to understand as an outside observer.

“Within these systems, people with disabilities and their direct care staff can become further and further removed from the action of daily life, and lead lives in parallel to their peers without disabilities—with few interactions, largely unseen and unheard,” said Berns. “The DEI Virtual Conference speaker lineup will offer valuable perspectives on how meaningful change must be the result of collective partnership and advocacy across all facets of society.”

Conference keynote and civil rights advocate Dr. Kimberlé W. Crenshaw will provide insight into the “intersectionality” framework—a concept she pioneered—addressing how overlapping identities, such as disability, gender identity, and race, can lead to complex, and sometimes under-recognized, issues of inequity and inequality.  Dr. Crenshaw currently serves as the Isidor and Seville Sulzbacher Professor of Law at Columbia Law School, as well as a Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Examining the existing support systems and how to reach a more inclusive future is the focus of the plenary session lineup. Plenary Speaker Kerri E. Neifeld, Commissioner of the Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) in New York State, will present how her office is working to stabilize, professionalize, and strengthen the direct support workforce following the pandemic, while also advancing diversity, equity and inclusion in the developmental disabilities field.

Plenary Speaker Tawara Goode, Associate Professor and Director, Georgetown University National Center for Cultural Competence, will evaluate cultural and linguistic competence in the industry’s collective efforts to advance DEI, and more specifically, what it means to achieve outcomes in the IDD space, while Plenary Speaker Atif Choudhury, CEO of the UK-based company, Diversity & Ability, will share insights from his lived experience and career on topics ranging from how to evaluate an organization’s progress toward a fully inclusive culture to proactive acknowledgments of intersectionality.

“The quality of insight and dedication to advancing social justice outcomes at this conference is exceptional,” said Perry. “With more than 30 sessions, including speakers from a variety of professional disciplines and backgrounds, we are anticipating a day of learning and connection that advances a more inclusive and equitable future for all. That’s why the conference recordings and an event toolkit will be freely available for a year following the event. This event is intended to serve as a resource, informing and empowering more organizations and individuals.”

The DEI Virtual Conference “Beyond the Comfort Zone: Understanding and Eradicating Injustice, Racism and Inequality in the Field of Developmental Disabilities” will be held on Wednesday, May 18 from 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. ET at ahrc.org/deiconference. The event is free and open to all. Closed captioning will be available for all sessions; American Sign Language is available for plenary and select sessions.

FREE NASW Continuing Education Credits Available NASW-NYS is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers (Provider ID #0014), licensed mental health counselors (Provider ID #MHC-0053), and licensed marriage and family therapists (Provider ID #MFT-0037), and licensed psychologists (Provider ID #PSY-0088)

About Us
AHRC Nassau, a chapter of The Arc New York, is one of the largest agencies in New York State supporting people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Based in Nassau County, the nonprofit empowers people to lead fulfilling lives, together with family, friends and community. AHRC’s programs include a wide array of supports for people with disabilities and their families, including vocational and employment services, adult day habilitation and community-based services, guardianship, family support services and respite/ recreation opportunities, as well as residential services. AHRC Nassau is part of an elite group of international agencies accredited by CQL | The Council on Quality and Leadership for Person-Centered Excellence Accreditation With Distinction. AHRC is also one of four agencies accredited by New York State’s Office for People With Developmental Disabilities as a Compass agency, which is the highest level of accreditation offered. For more information, visit www.ahrc.org.

The Arc of the United States advocates with and serves people wit­­h intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy, and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of nearly 600 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with IDD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes. For more information, visit thearc.org.

For more information, please contact Nicole Zerillo, assistant director of Community Resources, AHRC Nassau, at 516.626.1075, ext. 1134, or nzerillo@ahrc.org.

SOURCE AHRC Nassau

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

A volunteer in a tie dye shirt holds a paper bag of food donations

That’s Amore: Volunteers With Disabilities Address Food Insecurity Through Pasta Kits

In honor of National Volunteer Month, The Arc is highlighting the efforts of volunteers with disabilities. While these individuals are serving their neighbors, they are also a living example of the tremendous value they bring to their communities.

A volunteer in a wheelchairs sits at a table. He is working on meal kit assembly, with various items strewn across the table, wile other volunteers stand nearby helping.

The staff and clients at AHRC Nassau know the value of a home cooked meal – and the comfort and joy it brings to a family. For their 2022 MLK Day of Service event, they wanted to extend that joy while offering tangible food assistance to their community in

Brookville, New York. They decided to create, pack, and deliver pasta meal kits to their neighbors experiencing food insecurity. Volunteers were empowered by learning what ingredients and steps were needed to cook a delicious meal. They also helped to show that people with disabilities are not always the ones in need of service and can give back to their communities as well.

Twenty volunteers with disabilities directed each phase of the process, from finding all the ingredients to setting up the event in January. Some of AHRC Nassau’s clients created hand-written cards celebrating the spirit of the initiative. Others designed artwork, each piece inscribed with a quote from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.: “Only in the darkness can you see the stars.” These items were placed in the meal kits alongside the ingredients.

A woman with red dyed hair in a black sweatshirt stands, smiling and holding a package of food, in the grocery store.As the big day arrived, volunteers with disabilities again led the way, including Nijah, who oversaw setup. Others prepared the boxes, packed the meal kits, and completed quality inspection. Once all boxes were packed and ready for distribution, the group delivered 100 meal kits to Island Harvest, Long Island’s food bank. In total, 400 individuals were served that day.

Long Islanders facing hunger weren’t the only beneficiaries of the day. Each volunteer shared a collective sense of accomplishment in combatting food insecurity in their backyard. More importantly, the volunteers with disabilities felt pride that they have demonstrated that everyone plays a critical role in making their community more equitable for all—showing the true meaning of the quote from King that “Everybody can be great…because anybody can serve.”

Want to learn how to engage volunteers with disabilities? The Arc’s tip sheet Planning for Including People with Intellectual Disabilities in Volunteer Programs can help your organization get started.

a group of people of varying ages walk on a field with sunset in the background. They all wear blue shirts that say "volunteer".

Combating Hunger through Inclusive Volunteering for MLK Day 2022

Food insecurity is a significant problem across the United States and has been magnified by the COVID-19 pandemic. While food banks typically provide for more than 37 million Americans each year, in 2020 this number skyrocketed to more than 60 million.

Against this backdrop and for the sixth year in a row, The Arc teamed up with local chapters of The Arc and other community organizations to lead MLK Day of Service events throughout the weekend. Through a grant from AmeriCorps, The Arc and its partners designed inclusive volunteering initiatives that helped reduce food insecurity in their own backyards. These projects also served as a living testament to the words of Dr. King “Everyone can be great because everyone can serve” by demonstrating that volunteers with disabilities are capable and eager to serve their communities alongside volunteers without disabilities.

The 2022 MLK grantees include AHRC Nassau, AHRC NYC, Ridge Area Arc, STAR, Inc., The Arc Harrisonburg and Rockingham, The Arc Muskegon, The Arc Nature Coast, The Arc of South Carolina, The Arc of the Quad Cities Area, The Arc Oklahoma (TARC), UCP Seguin, and Youth Impact.

So far, these dedicated organizations tackled hunger in a variety of ways including:

  • Partnering with local professional chefs to host online cooking classes for individuals with disabilities
  • Donating goods to local food kitchens
  • Assembling boxed meals and backpacks for school children
  • Executing drive-through and mobile food truck food drives
  • Delivering meals to home-bound seniors

The Arc has made tremendous strides in the fight against hunger in communities across the country. Last year, an army of over 1,000 volunteers donated close to 12,000 hours of their time to assure 26,300 of their fellow citizens had nourishing food on the table. This year we are striving to make an even bigger impact!

For these organizations, MLK Day is only the beginning of their efforts to eliminate hunger in their communities. These grantees have now turned their attention to implementing additional service events in the coming months that will continue to collect and distribute even more food. Not only do these volunteer opportunities strengthen communities, they also demonstrate the value in volunteering all year long, not just on MLK Day. In an effort to create even more year-round volunteer opportunities, The Arc is simultaneously leading another AmeriCorps grant, the September 11th National Day of Service and Remembrance, dedicated to emergency preparedness and helping communities be better prepared in case of disaster.

Want to join us? You can search and sign up for volunteering events in your area here.

September 11 Day of Service Grantees Give Back and Help Prepare Their Communities

This past September marked the 20th anniversary of the September 11 attacks. To honor all who were lost, The Arc joined forces with local chapters of The Arc and other community organizations to develop inclusive volunteer projects centered around the September 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance (9/11 Day).

These projects aimed to strengthen and prepare communities for all types of emergencies. Their goal was also to challenge the perception that individuals with disabilities are only service recipients by demonstrating that volunteers with and without disabilities can and do serve their communities side-by-side.

The Arc’s 2021 9/11 Day grantees spent much of the past year preparing for their keynote September 11 weekend events. This year’s grantees included Egyptian Area Agency on Aging, Ridge Area Arc, The Arc of Hanover, The Arc Central Chesapeake Region, Athletes for Hope, Greater Susquehanna Valley United Way, The Arc of Palm Beach County, The Arc Nature Coast, and The Arc Tennessee.

These dedicated organizations served their communities in a variety of ways, including:

  • Hosting community-wide artistic events, which provided a space for community members to create collaborative art that honors those lost on 9/11 and promotes collective strength, resiliency, and remembrance
  • Designing handmade cards of appreciation for local first responders
  • Assembling and distributing emergency kits to local families
  • Distributing emergency preparedness information and templates to community members
  • Installing fire alarms for homeowners living in high-risk neighborhoods

Together, our grantees recruited over 1,000 volunteers, who spent close to 5,000 hours leading a variety of emergency planning activities that benefited over 4,100 individuals.

We would love for your organization to join us next year by building an emergency preparedness volunteer program in your community. We are currently accepting grant applications for the 2022 September 11 National Day of Service and Remembrance – and the deadline to apply is November 4. Learn more and apply here!

Photo of desks in a classroom with dim, moody lighting

Federal Court Blocks Iowa’s Law Banning Masking Requirements in Schools

DES MOINES, Iowa — A federal district court today blocked Iowa’s law prohibiting schools from requiring masks. The court ruled that the law violates the civil rights of children with disabilities, including children with underlying conditions, who are more vulnerable to severe illness or death as a result of COVID-19.

The decision makes clear that children have a right under Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act to equal access to their educations, which for some children with underlying conditions and disabilities, requires that schools implement universal masking requirements.

The district court recognized that “forcing children to bear the brunt of societal discord is ‘illogical and unjust’” and cited data showing that “the current level of the delta variant in Iowa has increased the infection rate and severity of infection. Some public schools in Iowa are experiencing COVID-19 infection rates at upwards of 60 percent that of last year’s total for the entire school year.” The court also cited data showing that the number of children hospitalized due to COVID-19 is also on the rise.

The decision comes in a case brought by the American Civil Liberties Union, ACLU of Iowa, Disability Rights Iowa, The Arc of the United States, and law firms Arnold & Porter and Duff Law Firm, P.L.C. on behalf of The Arc of Iowa and 11 parents of children with disabilities.

The following statements are from:

Shira Wakschlag, Senior Director of Legal Advocacy and General Counsel, The Arc of the United States:

“The court is making it clear that students with disabilities have the right to go to school safely during this pandemic. The Arc will continue fighting to ensure that students with disabilities are able to attend their neighborhood schools alongside their peers without disabilities without putting their health and their lives at risk.”

Rita Bettis Austen, legal director of the ACLU of Iowa:

“We are grateful to the district court for blocking this dangerous law, which put vulnerable kids in harm’s way and violated their civil rights in education. We are relieved that schools across the state will now be able to protect those kids as required by federal law. No parent should be asked to choose between the safety and health of their child and their child’s ability to go to school, but that’s exactly the position that this law put parents across Iowa in.”

Susan Mizner, director of the ACLU’s Disability Rights Program:

“This is a huge victory for our plaintiffs and all parents of children with disabilities who have been forced to choose between protecting the health of their children and ensuring they receive an education alongside their peers. This decision opens the door for schools across Iowa to take basic public health measures to protect their students. It also should send a message to other states that they cannot put politics above the rights and safety of students with disabilities. Disability rights laws were passed precisely for this situation – in which children with disabilities health and education would be sacrificed for the convenience of the majority. Banning the possibility that schools may require masks — in the middle of a pandemic — discriminates against school children with disabilities. All students with disabilities should be able to attend school safely, as federal disability rights laws guarantee.”

Catherine E. Johnson, executive director, Disability Rights Iowa:

“The order entered today restores our students’ with disabilities long-held civil rights of equal access to their education and full inclusion with their general education peers in the school curriculum and all other activities and programs offered by their school. Today is a monumental day for all plaintiffs, as well as all Iowans forced to choose between sacrificing their child’s health or education opportunities. Effective today, parents no longer have to make this impossible choice, their children are entitled to both.”

Photos and videos of some clients, attorneys, and organizational logos available here: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1-XIhBS5ZyNVRRh9lENyhqMbJi5PLqqky

More details about this case are here: https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/lawsuit-challenges-iowa-law-banning-schools-requiring-masks

The decision is here: https://www.aclu.org/legal-document/arc-iowa-v-reynolds-order-granting-temporary-restraining-order

This statement is here: https://www.aclu.org/press-releases/federal-court-blocks-iowas-law-banning-masking-requirements-schools

 

MLK Day logo that says "MLK Day of Service - Corporation for National and Community Service"

Individual Food Drives Help Feed Hungry Tulsans

As The Arc of Oklahoma watched COVID-19 infections rise in their state in the second half of 2020, they hoped restrictions would decrease in time for their MLK Day of Service event in January 2021. But as the year progressed and COVID cases continued their upward trend, the organization began laying the groundwork to transition their in-person event into a virtual one. Regardless of the format, the goal remained the same: make a notable dent in Tulsa’s 15.8% food insecure population.

MLK Day of Service volunteers

Interested in hosting your own MLK Day of Service event? Apply for a grant from The Arc and AmeriCorps to help organize your 2022 service project, give back to your community, and promote the inclusion of people with disabilities!

The Arc of Oklahoma’s Board of Directors, members of their Self-Advocacy Program, and community partners ultimately decided that individual food drives would maintain the integrity of the event while preserving the health and safety of all involved. So, “Individual Food Drive Hosts” set to work, collecting food items from families, neighbors, church members, and co-workers. Hosts then donated the items to their chosen pantry. By the end of March, 60 volunteers had administered individual food drives, serving nearly 430 of their fellow Tulsans.

The recipients of the individual food drives were not the only beneficiaries of the program. Volunteers from The Arc of Oklahoma’s Self-Advocacy Program also reaped benefits, growing professionally and personally. The majority of the volunteers have an intellectual and/or developmental disability (IDD) and experience difficulty communicating verbally and in social situations. Service projects such as these allow people with IDD to play a vital role in their communities though volunteering. As an added bonus, these individuals gain access to a welcoming and safe environment to practice social interactions and build the confidence needed to speak up for themselves and others.

Although the format of The Arc of Oklahoma’s 2021 MLK Day of Service event changed from their original proposal, it was a wonderful kick-off to a year of service, just as Dr. King had envisioned. Subsequent activities, such as the organization’s recent drive-through food distribution, have furthered the goal of alleviating hunger in Tulsa.

As The Arc of Oklahoma’s service events continue into the summer and fall, the organization’s true impact on food insecurity has yet to be seen. But if the following statement from a family who benefited from the food drive is any indication, the organization’s impact promises to be significant!

“I want to thank you with all my heart for how much you have helped us! You are wonderful people. Thank you for being so generous. Thank you to everyone who has helped us through you. You are angels to our family, and we are fortunate to know you!”

A gloved hand holding a vaccine vial, with the words COVID-19 in black on a board behind it.

Vaccine Discrimination: Disability Advocacy Groups File Federal Lawsuit Alleging 6 Maryland Jurisdictions Discriminate in Vaccine Process

Today, The Arc Maryland, represented by Disability Rights Maryland, The Arc of the United States, and Brown & Barron, LLC filed a federal lawsuit alleging that six jurisdictions in Maryland, including Baltimore City, discriminate against people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) by denying them opportunities to access COVID-19 vaccinations inconsistent with the State’s Executive order and Vaccination Plan. This discrimination puts lives at stake and violates the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act.

Five counties and Baltimore City are identified in the lawsuit as excluding individuals with IDD in their list of who is eligible, preventing those with IDD from accessing vaccinations. The counties include, Queen Anne’s County, Carroll County, Garrett County, Somerset County, and Talbot County.

Ivis Burris has muscular dystrophy and requires support staff to come to her apartment to assist her with nursing needs. She lives in Baltimore City with her adult son who has Down syndrome. Under the state Vaccination Plan, they are both eligible for the vaccine under Phase 1B as individuals with IDD. But when Ms. Burris went to the Baltimore City COVID-19 website, she thought she wasn’t eligible to request the vaccine for herself and her son because the City excludes people with IDD from its list of those eligible for Phase 1B. Ms. Burris explains, “I want a fair chance like everybody else to live. My son deserves a fair chance to live. Considering our situation – I need a ventilator to breathe and my son is at higher risk because of his Down syndrome – it is really critical that we get the vaccine. Our disabilities put us at higher risk.”

“It is frustrating to have our state recognize people with IDD to be the 1B priority group for the vaccine, only for people with IDD to be denied equitable access to the vaccine from the counties in which they live. We hope this action will result in immediate change for the benefit of all,” said Ray Marshall, board president of The Arc Maryland.

It is well established that COVID-19-related fatality rates among people with IDD who test positive for COVID-19 are nearly three times greater than the mortality rates among the general population who are positive for the virus. People with IDD also face heightened risk because many rely on caregivers or direct support professionals who provide assistance with activities of daily living, for which social distancing is often not possible. Frequently, such caregivers serve multiple people raising risks of transmission. Despite advocacy from The Arc Maryland, people with IDD are not getting equal access to vaccines, compelling the need for the lawsuit.

“We need these localities to take immediate corrective action to fix their information; to fix forms that exclude individuals with disabilities from claiming eligibility and seeking vaccine appointments; to tell health department staff and others that people with disabilities are eligible and to assist them with obtaining the vaccine. The Americans with Disabilities Act was passed over thirty years ago with a purpose of ending historic inequities in health care. We need immediate action to protect lives,” said Lauren Young, Litigation Director for Disability Rights Maryland.

“Throughout this pandemic, The Arc has fought to ensure that people with disabilities nationwide have equal access to treatment and are not subject to medical discrimination,” said Peter Berns, CEO for The Arc of the United States. “As vaccines are distributed around the country, we will remain vigilant to ensure people with IDD are not discriminated against in this process.”

“Ensuring that vulnerable populations have access to life-saving vaccines, and that the State’s distribution plan prioritizing these populations is followed, is in accordance with Brown & Barron’s core principles and values of promoting access to quality healthcare for all. We are proud to stand behind The Arc in supporting these individuals and communities at this crucial time,” said Brian Brown, managing member of Brown & Barron, LLC.”

The Arc of the United States is the largest grassroots organization dedicated to advancing the civil rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Arc Maryland is an affiliate of The Arc of the United States. There are 11 chapters of The Arc throughout the state, including The Arc Maryland.

Disability Rights Maryland (DRM), a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, is Maryland’s designated Protection & Advocacy agency. DRM advocates to advance the civil rights of people with disabilities throughout Maryland. 

Brown & Barron, LLC is a civil justice law firm in Baltimore, Maryland.

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Adapting to Changing Landscapes: The Creativity and Perseverance of The Arc’s Chapters During COVID-19

Over the last 10 months, the COVID-19 pandemic has undeniably shifted the reality of how we connect with each other. To protect the safety of people with disabilities, their families, and our staff, The Arc’s chapters were forced to rapidly shut down in-person services and shift to a virtual format. Many chapters worried they might not be able to sustain the services and programming that are critical to their communities.

Comcast NBCUniversal recognized that the pandemic threatened to cut off critical local support systems for people with disabilities at a time when they were needed the most and stepped up to quickly provide support. Comcast generously provided grants with flexibility so chapters of The Arc could make the most impact in their fight to safely prevent isolation and support overburdened families. This allowed our chapters to explore new and innovative ways to engage families in the community, at times reaching more people than in the past.

At New Star, Inc. in Illinois and Indiana, the virtual environment brought by the pandemic has provided new opportunities to connect to the community in ways not previously available. For example, the shift has provided 35-year-old Alyssa with the possibility to participate in programming she was unable to before. Before the pandemic, Alyssa couldn’t participate in day programming for years due to her intense medical needs resulting from Angelman Syndrome. When her chapter’s offerings shifted to an online format, it increased her ability to join activities like being read to, exercise programs, socialization with peers, and music therapy. Alyssa’s mother, Renee Valfre stated,

“I have seen her cognition, attending and comprehension skills improve. I find the structure Zoom offers her in a setting at home, that is calm without the stimulus of others’ movements, vocalizations and outbursts, allows Alyssa to focus on the activity. Without virtual programming, Alyssa would have had no instruction or involvement with other individuals during the quarantine.”

A young man stands in his home on a hardwood floor with a few plants behind him and an area rug to his right. A small gray dog naps on a piece of furniture to his left.
David dances with his peers during a virtual Friday dance party

Another New Star virtual program, the Friday dance party, has provided valuable opportunities for social engagement as participants struggle through prolonged isolation at home. Each week, dance party participants work together to pick a theme and songs. On Friday, they gather on video to let loose, do musical trivia, learn new dances, and take turns co-DJing and interacting with peers.

Community member David has been at home and unable to spend time with his friends since March. During this time, his dance parties were limited to a party of one. But with the help of New Star’s Community Day Services and the webcams purchased with their Comcast grant funding, he has been able to join group dance parties and interact with friends while doing what he loves!

David’s mom, Denise Rhodes, couldn’t be happier with how much the program has helped him: “I always say, get up and get active! Virtual dance parties have helped David do that!”

Comcast’s assistance helped open a virtual door for another group The Arc provides services for: parents. Many parents of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities informed The Arc of Aurora in Colorado that schooling their children with Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) at home was challenging. With support from Comcast, The Arc of Aurora created a no-cost online training for parents called Schooling at Home: Your Guide To Remote and Hybrid Learning With IEP Supports. Both parents and educators have enrolled since the training kicked off in September, and that number rises each week. The training delves into how to navigate the special education system and speak up for students in areas like IEPs, procedural rights, and documentation as well as downloadable resources.

“The training aided in clarity for remote learning information and future planning. As a seasoned mom-advocate, I definitely learned things I didn’t know and hadn’t heard!” -Marry Baker, mother of child with IDD

Comcast NBCUniversal’s support extends far beyond chapter funding. They are leveraging their media platforms to raise public awareness of the impacts of the pandemic on people with IDD—including through multiple segments on the TODAY Show, expanding internet access to low-income families and school districts through Internet Essentials, and advancing accessibility with technology like the voice-activated remote control, X1 eye control, and a dedicated service center for customers with disabilities.

As our chapters continue to find creative solutions to the challenges brought forth by COVID-19, they can breathe a little easier knowing that partners like Comcast will continue to have the backs of people with disabilities, their families, and those who support them.


These grants and more are made possible by:

Comcast logo featuring rainbow icon above the text

Click Here for Inclusion: Staying Connected During COVID-19

For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), a fully integrated life in the community often depends on not only people-powered supports like direct support professionals and job coaches, but on the technology to facilitate skill building, social connection, and much more.

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world and shut down entire communities, people with disabilities saw many of those connections and daily routines come screeching to a halt.

Seeing the desperate need for solutions, Comcast NBCUniversal stepped up to quickly provide support where it was needed most. Comcast generously provided grants with flexibility so chapters of The Arc could make the most impact in their fight to safely prevent isolation and support overburdened families. This allowed our chapters to explore new and innovative ways to engage families in the community, at times reaching more people than in the past.

In Larimer County, Colorado, Sam and his mother found themselves stuck at home together and sharing her work laptop. Sam was able to use the laptop for high school classes and his social life—but because his mom also needed it for work, his usage was limited. On top of that, he was not able to download everything he needed for school. The other devices in the house were either no longer able to connect to the internet, out of storage, or not exclusively his. The lack of access prevented him from participating in Zoom calls with his fellow high school classmates and put him behind not only socially but academically. Sam and his mom felt frustrated and left behind, as so many others have during this pandemic.

Through the support of Comcast NBCUniversal, The Arc of Larimer County was able to help Sam and his mother by providing Sam his own new laptop to use however and whenever he wanted. He was finally able to reconnect with his friends virtually and have a sense of independence with having something of his own, giving him something positive as he toughs out the continued isolation wrought by COVID-19.

And Sam’s not the only one thrilled with his new computer! His mom says, “This will be a great stress relief, an answer to prayers. We have been actively looking and trying to make do with my work computer and the one we have to return. Thank you so much for helping our family in this tough time.”          

On the East Coast in Philadelphia, Eloisa Maglaya found herself facing the same challenges. Prior to COVID-19, she was very active in the community and enjoyed attending a variety of events. But once she was home with few options to safely socialize and stay active, she found herself feeling isolated and frustrated. This all changed with the tablet given to her by The Arc of Philadelphia. With her new tablet, she is able to:

  • Maintain a daily routine
  • Stream virtual Zumba classes (her favorite pre-pandemic activity) and stay active
  • Watch movies in her native Tagalog Philippine language
  • Learn how to navigate app usage directions, stream her favorite videos, and better use the device features with the help of her direct support professional
  • Stay updated on COVID-19 safety procedures 

The positive effects of Eloisa’s tablet have been immeasurable. Her family and The Arc’s staff have reported seeing her more joyous and happier!

Comcast NBCUniversal’s support extends far beyond chapter funding. They are leveraging their media platforms to raise public awareness of the impacts of the pandemic on people with IDD—including through multiple segments on the TODAY Show, expanding internet access to low-income families and school districts through Internet Essentials, and advancing accessibility with technology like the voice-activated remote control, X1 eye control, and a dedicated service center for customers with disabilities.

In our hyper-connected world, technology was already what kept us connected from day to day. But as we limit physical contact to stay safe, digital access has become more vital than ever. For people with IDD—who have had to fight for decades for the chance to be included in their communities—access to the digital world ensures that progress is not lost and they can remain connected and engaged with the people and activities they love most.

These grants and more are made possible by:

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a group of people of varying ages walk on a field with sunset in the background. They all wear blue shirts that say "volunteer".

2020 MLK Grantees Continue the Fight Against Hunger

Since 2015, The Arc has been the proud recipient of a grant from the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the federal agency that funds the national Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service activities. Under this grant, chapters of The Arc and other organizations executed projects all across the U.S, uniting volunteers with and without disabilities in service to their communities.

With the pandemic plunging millions into hunger, the following organizations followed in the footsteps of their predecessors and designed initiatives that sought to reduce food insecurity in their individual neighborhoods:  

The Arc of Midland (MI); Ridge Area Arc (FL); The Arc Nature Coast (FL); The Arc of the Glades (FL); The Arc of South Carolina; UCP Seguin (IL); The Arc of Oklahoma (formerly TARC); Choices for Community Living, Inc. (DE); The Arc of Southwest Colorado; The Arc Lane County (OR); The Arc of Rockland (NY); AHRC New York City; Holly Ridge Center (WA); The Arc Jacksonville (FL); Youth Impact (TX); The Nashville Food Project (TN); The Arc Williamson County (TN); The Arc Central Virginia; Boys & Girls Club Blue Ridge (VA); Stone Soup Cafe/All Souls Church (MA); Star, Inc. (CT); Arc of Calhoun & Cleburne Counties (AL); Cass Community Social Services (MI), and last but certainly not least, Arc of Quad Cities Area (IL)

These grantees worked tirelessly to deliver food assistance to their neighbors experiencing food insecurity, many for the first time. With the pandemic in full swing by March, organizations quickly modified their initiatives to adhere to social distancing guidelines.   Projects ranged in size and scope, and often reflected the culture of their community. Volunteers engaged in a variety of service opportunities, including:

  • Organizing food drives to collect food from individuals, businesses, and restaurants
  • Working in gardens or with farmers to gather, package, and distribute fresh fruits and vegetables to local food banks
  • Strengthening the capacity of local Meals on Wheels and Elderly Nutrition programs to serve home-bound seniors
  • Partnering with soup kitchens and elementary schools to serve lunch and dinner to community residents experiencing food insecurity

At the end of the grant period, 3,500 volunteers with and without disabilities had served 76,000 meals to 30,000 of their neighbors, contributing 27,000 hours and $753,000 in value to their respective organizations.

At a moment when the need for hunger assistance continues to climb in America, every grantee rose to the challenge. More importantly, while these dedicated organizations were delivering food aid to their neighbors, they were simultaneously demonstrating a timeless truth: the tremendous contribution volunteers with disabilities bring to their local communities. For all their time and efforts, The Arc will be forever grateful.

With COVID-19 wreaking havoc so many lives, volunteering in your local community is more important than ever. The Arc is once again partnering with CNCS to offer $5,000, $10,000, and $15,000 grants to chapters of The Arc and other local nonprofit organizations to develop September 11th Day of Service and Remembrance projects. Learn more about this exciting opportunity and apply by December 4. We would love to have your organization join us!