Thank you! The Arc Family is Thankful for YOU!

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we here at The Arc have a lot to be thankful for and one of the main things is YOU!

The Arc is incomplete without you and your dedication to our mission to ensure that those with intellectual and developmental disabilities live a fully inclusive life. You breathe life into our mission and together we will be successful.

From the board and staff of the National office of The Arc, please accept our sincere and deep appreciation of YOU and your ongoing support of our cause nationally, statewide and locally.

We could not have accomplished all that we did this year without you, so this holiday season we wanted to THANK YOU for your commitment, support and generosity to The Arc.

From all of us here at The Arc, we wish you a safe and happy Thanksgiving.

The Arc Joins #GivingTuesday

#GivingTuesday_Shareable_ImageThe Arc is joining the national #GivingTuesday movement again this year and we need your help!

As part of The Arc’s family, please help us kick off the holiday season by joining millions in taking collaborative action to improve their local communities and give back in better, smarter ways to the charities and causes they support to help create a better world.

Join us in harnessing the power of social media to demonstrate and expand the vibrant community that makes up The Arc’s Family. Please show your support on social media to inspire and encourage your family, friends and network to take action as well this #GivingTuesday.

Millions of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families are depending on The Arc. This #GivingTuesday, show that they can count on you by participating in one of the following ways:

 

  • Share your support by posting our “I Support The Arc” Button on Facebook or Twitter and tag The Arc and #GivingTuesday

 

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  • Encourage your friends and family to do the same.

The Arc recognizes that all the work we do would not be possible without our family and that not all support comes in the same way. Thank you!

Help The Arc kick off the holiday season today and Achieve with Us!

CONGRESS PASSED LEGISLATION THAT WILL ENABLE MILITARY MEMBERS TO NAME SPECIAL NEEDS TRUSTS AS BENEFICIARIES OF A SURVIVOR BENEFIT PLAN; RETIREE ACTION POSSIBLE SOON

by: Theresa M. Varnet M.S.W., J.D. (Spain, Spain & Varnet, P.C., Chicago, IL and Fletcher Tilton, P.C., Worcester, MA)

On December 15, 2014, Congress passed the Disabled Military Child Protection Act which allows military families to protect their Survivor Benefit Plans (SBP) by allowing the benefits to be directed to a qualified special needs trust. If there are any funds left in the trust when the disabled beneficiary dies, the funds are paid back to Medicaid for the cost of Medicaid funded services provided to the individual over his/her lifetime.

The Military allows military members who have children with disabilities to participate in the SBP. SBP permits monthly benefit stipends of up to 55% of the military member’s pension to be paid for the benefit of a disabled adult child. Prior to the passage of this Act, benefits had to be paid directly to the adult child. The Disabled Military Child Protection Act will allow the survivor benefit to be paid directly to a “payback special needs trust” for the benefit of a child with a disability. If the benefits are distributed directly to the trust, the beneficiary will remain eligible for needs-based benefits such as SSI and Medicaid.

Beneficiaries of a parent’s SBP can now retain eligibility for Medicaid by assigning the military pension to the qualified special needs trust. A qualified special needs trust is sometimes called a ‘payback’ trust, first party trust, self-settled trust, d4(a), d4(c) trust, or an OBRA’93 trust. It is not the typical 3rd party special needs trust that parents provide in their wills and living trusts. By assigning benefits to a qualified special needs trust, these individuals will now be able to remain eligible for Medicaid which is the primary payer of long term supports and services available to persons with disabilities. Up until now, individuals who received SBP were often locked out of Medicaid funded support programs because their income was deemed too high. If the pension benefits caused him to be over income for Medicaid but did not provide sufficient income for private care, the beneficiary of a SBP was often in a worse off position because of the receipt of this pension. S/he had too much income to qualify for Medicaid but not enough income to meet one’s medical and personal care needs.

It is anticipated that military regulations will be written by the end of this year or by early 2016. Early indications are that the designation to a trust can be made by the military member anytime during his lifetime, but also assignable by the benefit recipient if or when the benefit is being received. Retirees cannot make the assignment now, but hopefully will be able to do so by early next year. We were initially told that there was going to be a narrow window of opportunity to change the beneficiary designation from the disabled child to a trust. We are now told that there will not be a restriction as to when the designation to a trust can be made. Of course, until the regulations are written, we will not know for certain what will be allowed. If you know anyone who may be receiving SBP benefits or could be eligible in the future, it is important to get this information out to them so they are ready to make the change in beneficiary as soon as possible. It is important to meet with an attorney knowledgeable in drafting a ‘payback’ trust. It is critical that the correct type of trust be designated as a beneficiary. If a typical 3rd party special needs trust is used that does not contain the restrictive language required in a payback trust, the assignment will not qualify the beneficiary of the trust for Medicaid and SSI. Parents can find the name of an attorney familiar with drafting qualified payback special needs trusts through the websites for the Academy for Special Needs Planners (ASNP) or the Special Needs Alliance (SNA). ASNP AND SNA are two professional organizations for attorneys who concentrate in this very unique and dynamic area of law.

American Diabetes Month: Healthy Lifestyle Choices and Exercise.

5736670215_b791c39490_zType 2 diabetes affects a staggering 23.6 million people or in another light an astonishing 7.8 percent of the American population. Studies suggest that adults who have autism are at a higher risk for diabetes, obesity, and heart complications.

In light of November being American Diabetes Awareness Month we wanted to highlight some risk factors of diabetes as well as some healthy eating tips to help decrease the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

Risk Factors:

In order to prevent diabetes, it is important to know that there are certain risk factors that increase your chances of developing diabetes.  While there are more risk factors, below is a list of some of the more prevalent hazards:

  • Being overweight or obese
  • Not getting enough exercise or extended physical inactivity
  • Having a high cholesterol count
  • A history of heart disease
  • Hypertension

Healthy Lifestyle

The only way to be healthier is to live a healthier lifestyle! Combating the risk factors of diabetes can include eating healthier  and increasing and maintaining regular exercise.

Did you know that adults with disabilities who don’t exercise are 50% more likely to develop chronic diseases? Getting more exercise doesn’t mean you have to sign up for a marathon or triathlon, try adding a new physical activity to your routine. Remember to stay active for 30 minutes, 3 times per week.

Eating healthier is a great way to maintain a healthy weight, as well as protect against the onset of diabetes. Try a couple of the tips below:

  • Drink plenty of water
  • Choose foods low in salt
  • Cut down on sugary food and candies
  • Eat lean meats (fish, chicken, or even vegetarian alternatives)
  • Eat balanced meals

Other Resources

Check out these other great resources to keep healthy and prevent developing diabetes!

Diabetes booklet for Self-Advocates

Healthier Eating Ideas

Diabetes Risk Factors Test

Diabetes Health Resources

NCHPAD Diabetes Resources

Need Health Insurance? Open Enrollment is Now!

2016 Open Enrollment
November 1, 2015
Open enrollment begins

December 15, 2015
Enroll before this date to have coverage January 1, 2016

January 31, 2016
Open enrollment ends

If you are uninsured or looking for affordable health insurance, now is the time for you to look! During “open enrollment” you can purchase private health insurance through the marketplace in each state. Depending on your income, you may be eligible for assistance with your health insurance costs.
If you currently have insurance through the marketplace, you should look at your current plan and determine if it will continue to meet your needs, or select a better plan. If you do not take action, you will be automatically re-enrolled in your current plan. Re-enrollment provides an important opportunity to report any changes to your income. If you income has increased, reporting changes to the marketplace may help you avoid paying future penalties.

Why you should check your coverage:

  • Even if you like your health plan, new plans may be available and premiums or cost sharing may have changed since last year.
  • Even if your income has not changed, you could be eligible for more financial assistance.

If you have a disability or a health condition, pay attention to possible changes:

  • Are a broad range of health care providers included in the health plan’s network of providers?
  • Are there enough medical specialists in the network to meet your needs?
  • Are needed medications included in the plan’s list of covered drugs?
  • Is there adequate access to non-clinical, disability-specific services and supports?
  • Does the plan have service limits, such as caps on the number of office visits for therapy services?
  • Are mental health services covered to the same extent that other “physical” health benefits are covered?

Where to get help?
Health insurance can be complicated. If you or your family member needs assistance with understanding the options, healthcare.gov can help. This website has information about seeking assistance in local communities, explanations of health insurance terms, enrollment information and much more. There is also a 24-hour phone line for consumer assistance at 1-800-318-2596 to call for help.

Autism Now’s New Service – Public Speaking Engagements

DSCN2049By: Amy Goodman, Director of Autism Now

What’s new with Autism Now, you ask? Well, one of my new roles as director is doing consulting work that involves public speaking. Public speaking is something that is difficult for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but in order to overcome my fear of people and being social I decided to try something new. I decided it was time to for me to take my expertise from working on Autism Now and make my public speaking debut by offering services to anyone who wants me to come speak about autism, ASD, bullying, employment, or anything else related to Autism Now or TheArc@Work, our employment initiative here at The Arc.

I recently spoke at the 2015 Alabama disABILITY conference in Orange Beach, Alabama. I believe I was a success because I was able to connect with my audience of individuals with disabilities by presenting from my own experiences. For example, I was talking about dating, relationships, and marriage and I was able to use examples from my life of how I as a person with a disability was able to overcome challenges in order to be married. I was able to have a long term relationship because I was ready and needed it at that time in my life. I found someone who needed me as much as I needed them and it worked out for both of us.

Preparing for speaking engagements is a lot of work, but if done effectively can help build the confidence of the speaker. I prepare over a long period of time, like 2 to 3 months in advance, by reading the information, putting the information into an outline, and writing out what I want to say. Then writing note cards with less information and finally putting just enough information on the power point slides to remind me what to say. Usually that isn’t even full sentences.

I have learned relaxation techniques to help me with anxiety and after this first speaking engagement, I decided I will probably change how I deliver my message. Next time, I think I will share a story, a poem, or quote that has something to do with the topic I am presenting that day. The most important thing is to be able to grab your audience’s attention before starting your presentation. If you can make them laugh or smile then they will tend to be more attentive to what you have to say.

So, the next time you need someone to speak at your event or conference, who are you going to call? Amy Goodman, Director of Autism Now – I’m ready and at your service to share my story and experience your event. Contact me at agoodman@autismnow.org or 202.600.3489.