Osteoporosis Prevention

HealthMeetOsteoporosis, a condition where an individual’s bones become increasingly brittle and fragile, is one of the most commonly diagnosed bone diseases in the U.S. However, screening and diagnosis for individuals with disabilities are commonly overlooked. While screening for the general population usually starts later in life around age 65, individuals with disabilities should start being screened much earlier since the risk often comes at an earlier age. Osteoporosis is a secondary condition that can be alleviated (and in some cases prevented) if proper treatment and screening measures are in place.

Osteoporosis usually affects women (especially postmenopausal) more than men.   Women with specific disabilities that impair mobility are even more at risk to developing osteoporosis due to bone loss from immobility. Other lifestyle factors that can contribute to osteoporosis are:

  1. Low levels of calcium and vitamin D
  2. Smoking
  3. High levels of alcohol use
  4. Inactivity
  5. Small bone structure
  6. Frequent use of steroid treatments

Through the HealthMeet project we have found that the rate of falls for individuals with disabilities was 3 times higher than the rate for the general population. Falling can be particularly dangerous for an individual with osteoporosis, which can easily cause fractures and breaks that can lead to increased mobility issues and extensive hospital fees. Making sure homes and organizations are set up to prevent falls will help to decrease the initial risk of falling.

Some steps to take to help prevent osteoporosis are:

  1. Exercise – especially weight bearing exercises to help build bone density
  2. Limit alcohol intake and avoid smoking
  3. Eat a diet rich in calcium and vitamin D – Ask your doctor if you should be taking calcium or vitamin D supplements

Screening for osteoporosis can be difficult due to the tests that are required for diagnosis. Individuals with disabilities may not be able to sit in the required position to obtain x-rays or may have a hard time lying still for the amount of time required for the tests. Primary care physicians need to be educated to screening alternatives such as ultrasound, and the importance of prioritizing prevention methods for individuals with disabilities.

Check out The Arc’s HealthMeet page for more information relating to health and wellness.

Relias Learning and The Arc Announce New Partnership to Benefit State and Local Chapters Nationwide

Washington, DCRelias Learning, the leader in online training and compliance solutions for the healthcare market, announced today that it is partnering with The Arc, the largest national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families.

Relias Learning will offer Chapters of The Arc specialized rates on its Intellectual and Developmental Disability Training Library, which contains over 200 courses designed to improve competency and performance in community-based support, positive behavior support, autism support, customized employment, health and safety, and more. Relias Learning’s Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) and Autism Library provides courses approved by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB) for continuing education needs for Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) and to meet training requirements for the RBT certification.

“We are honored to announce our partnership with The Arc,” said Jim Triandiflou, CEO of Relias Learning. “Relias Learning is dedicated to providing tools necessary to build competencies and confidence in the Direct Support Workforce supporting those with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Delivering quality care begins with a skilled and trained workforce. Partnering with The Arc will put training in the hands of more people nationwide and help us to continue developing and delivering the best programs available.”

“Relias Learning has been a longtime friend to The Arc and we are thrilled to be entering into this partnership. This agreement will enable more members of The Arc’s network to utilize all of the high quality materials that Relias Learning has to offer. Continuing education courses, like the ones available, are essential to making sure employees are on the cutting edge of their respective fields. Working together The Arc and Relias Learning will be able to better serve individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and improve outcomes for them and their families,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

In addition to online training libraries, courses are offered through an individual course-by course purchase option via www.academy.reliaslearning.com.

Through the new partnership, The Arc member chapters are eligible for exclusive discounts on learning management library subscriptions and Relias Academy courses.

The Arc Applauds Introduction of SSI Restoration Act

Washington, DC – The Arc applauds today’s introduction of the Supplemental Security Income Restoration Act (SSI Restoration Act) by Representative Raul Grijalva (D-AZ), Senator Sherrod Brown (D-OH), Senator Bernie Sanders (D-VT), and Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA).

“The SSI Restoration Act will bring welcome relief to the millions of Americans with disabilities and seniors who look to SSI as a lifeline that protects against extreme poverty. Unfortunately, key standards that affect important areas such as how much a SSI beneficiary can save or earn have not changed in decades. The SSI Restoration Act will bring these standards up to date to better reflect the program’s original intent and strengthen SSI for extremely low income people with disabilities and seniors,” said Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer, Public Policy, The Arc.

The SSI Restoration Act would update the SSI resource limits, to $10,000 for an individual or $15,000 for a couple – the amount they would be today if adjusted for inflation since 1989, the last time the resource limits were updated. The bill would also update the general income disregard (to $112 per month) and the earned income disregard (to $364 per month) to the amounts they would be today if adjusted for inflation since 1972, the last time they were updated. Finally, the bill would repeal the in-kind support and maintenance provision and repeal the SSI transfer penalty.

For more information, read the Supplemental Security Income Restoration Act of 2015 Policy Brief and SSI FAQs.

On Mother’s Day – A Conversation with Mom and Board Member of The Arc, Kelly Piacenti

Kelly Piacenti with son and daughterKelly Piacenti is a mom to four – Allie, Olivia, Nick, and Frankie. Kelly is the Assistant Vice President, MetLife Center for Special Needs Planning, and a member of The Arc’s national board of directors. This Mother’s Day, we caught up with Kelly about what being a mom of a child with significant disabilities means to her, and how The Arc is a part of her life.

How did you and your family get to know The Arc?

Back in college, I worked in a group home in Massachusetts. I was going to school to become a social worker, and for four years I worked with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. I used to take those individuals to activities run by The Arc. So I knew about The Arc long before I had Nick.

When Nick was born, they told us to expect him to live a few months. Then they said to set our sights on 2. On January 7th, my Nick turned 14. He has defied the experts.

In my line of work, I travel all over the country and I get to see what chapters of The Arc are doing. Most recently, I visited The Arc of Hawaii and The Arc of Anchorage.

What does it mean to be a mom of a child with very significant disability?

I thought I had it all before Nick – two kids, a house, both my husband and I had great careers – but Nick really put life into perspective. For a while, you feel like everything is falling apart – but then we woke up, and realized what Nick gives us.

Nick’s smile means a whole lot more than many people’s words. He gives us the ability to focus in on what’s important. I just want all my kids to be happy and I want to provide them a good quality of life. The things I worried about before – spills on the rug, getting someone to soccer on time – I don’t worry about now. Nick has taught me more than I’ve taught anyone else as a mom.

As a member of The Arc’s national board, I’m all about the people with I/DD and the families that don’t feel like they have a voice. There’s a core group that just need support – information, a way to talk to each other, a connection.

My family is very fortunate. I’m there on the board to advocate for people like Nick that don’t have the resources, time, or energy to fight for what they need. Before Nick came into our lives, I didn’t have this in me – Nick gave me this ability, this drive.

What type of support do you receive from The Arc and from others in your family and community?

I’m a member of my local chapter, The Arc Morris in Morris Plains, New Jersey. I’m involved because I get so much information from The Arc locally and nationally. Nick doesn’t get services from my chapter – he may never – but it’s valuable to my family because of the depth and breadth of knowledge within The Arc’s network. I read The Arc’s website because I know it’s a fantastic source of information on all kinds of topics out there. I respond to their Action Alerts because while Nick may not be receiving the services in jeopardy now, he may down the line.

When families of children with significant disabilities call me, they crave information. I tell them The Arc’s website is the place to go.

What support would you like to receive that you aren’t receiving — how can we at The Arc do better to include people with the most significant disabilities and their moms and families in our work and our lives?

I talk to a lot of families with family members with significant disabilities in my role with The Arc and my career at MetLife. Many of them discount organizations like The Arc because they don’t utilize the services they provide. But they also need information, and a connection – and The Arc provides that.

I think we need an online place to communicate – a blog or forum where families can talk to each other. For those of us who are parents of children with significant disabilities, it’s all about the quality of life and seeing what’s out there. We need to connect and we can lean on The Arc’s expertise. From The Arc, I follow what’s going on with states setting up ABLE accounts, where there could be sibling group opportunities for my other kids – it’s about seeing what’s out there for us.

The Arc can and should capture the interest and engagement of all families. Do we know who is on our site at 2am looking for information, but may not be connected to a chapter? We don’t – and we should be reaching those people and engaging them.

I think all families can get involved with our advocacy work. Our Action Center is full of information to educate yourself about the policy issues that impact all people with I/DD. It’s just a matter of making those connections to these silent families.

GTO Cadets: A Law Enforcement Internship Program for Young Adults with Disabilities

NCCJD Promising Program Spotlight

GTO Cadets

Chief Chris Perkins, Tyler Caldwell, Cody Light, Joshua Leonard, Officer Travis Akins, Nicholas Medovich

By Officer Travis Akins

On November 10, 2014, the Roanoke Police Department held a press conference to officially launch GTO CADETS—“Grow Through Opportunity.” The GTO CADETS program allows young adults with disabilities to intern within the department. Cadets grow their professional skills and round out their resumes, and simultaneously provide law enforcement officers with coworkers with disabilities.

Officer Travis Akins worked closely with Chief Perkins to incorporate GTO CADETS into department life, establishing an internal policy and volunteer application process. The inaugural class included three young adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders and one with Down syndrome. A professional job coach, contracted through the Commonwealth of Virginia’s Department of Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS), is on site Monday through Friday to ensure GTO CADETS get the most out of their time with the department.

What exactly are GTO CADETS doing with their day?
After being outfitted with custom-designed GTO CADET uniforms—including badges—cadets complete tasks such as filing documents, shredding papers, copying and folding safety brochures, and providing department tours. Working up to 12 hours a week, each cadet receives assignments that play to their strengths. For example, one young man with autism disseminates daily assigned patrol vehicle keys to officers beginning their shifts. The position—which did not exist before the program—requires officers and detectives to sign for their patrol keys, ultimately both enhancing accountability and forcing interaction between officers and cadets.

GTO CADETS are also provided high community exposure. They assist the department with crime prevention presentations; role playing, co-training and molding the minds of young recruits in the police academy; acting as “McGruff the Crime Dog” for Senior Centers and elementary schools; changing Project Lifesaver transmitter batteries and bands on individuals with cognitive impairments who may wander; and riding in police vehicles in Christmas Parades and other popular events—in short, they act as a new face of law enforcement. Recently, a GTO CADET with Down syndrome co-presented with the Police Chief at a Bar Association luncheon. The cadet was responsible for the portion of the presentation focusing on the GTO CADET initiative.

Finally, each GTO CADET shift ends with 30 minutes of cardiovascular training in the department’s fitness facility.

GTO Cadets

Joshua Leonard and Tyler Caldwell

Testimonials
Officers in the department have noticed preconceived perceptions morphing into positive interactions, empathy, and camaraderie. Police personnel expect to see the GTO CADETS around the building and look forward to daily interactions—many employees see the GTO CADETS as the highlight of their week! The Department is now totally committed to an inclusive work place, and increasing job, life, and social skills for young adults with disabilities.

Officer Travis Akins, a contributing author for this blog, says, “As a sworn law enforcement officer in the Commonwealth of Virginia, I firmly believe our criminal justice system desperately needs to develop creative programs nationwide, specific to individuals with disabilities. All human beings, regardless of their unique challenges, deserve a fair and equitable opportunity to enhance their own quality of life. Every person fully deserves the opportunity to be active, engaged, informed, and included, regardless of ability. Recognizing such, our department created a truly innovative program specific to individuals with disabilities!”

For assistance implementing the GTO CADETS program, e-mail Officer Travis Akins at GTOcadets@gmail.com or call at (540) 632-7326. Follow and Like GTO CADETS on Facebook.