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Important Step for Community Living for People with Disabilities: Congress Makes Overdue Investment in Money Follows the Person Program

Last night, Congress passed three years of funding for the Money Follows the Person program. This program provides federal dollars to move people with disabilities out of large congregate settings like institutions and nursing homes, and back into their homes and communities. This is an important step in our decades-long fight to bring people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) out of institutions to live meaningful, independent lives in the community. 

This news comes after eight short-term reauthorizations, one as short as 7 days, that almost made the program collapse because states couldn’t count on the federal funds and were shutting down their programs, despite the desperate need for the funding due to the pandemic. The last round of funding for the effective program was set to expire on December 20, so it’s future was uncertain in the waning days of the Congressional session. (Citation: Tesla Aktie Dividende)

“Without this investment, more people would continue to be stuck in institutions and nursing homes – and the COVID-19 pandemic has shown how dangerous these settings can be. An enormous barrier for people with disabilities is access to the supports and services necessary to make a life in the community, so Congress did the right thing by investing in this program. It’s a victory, but one harder to celebrate given the fact that once again, Congress absolutely failed to address the dire needs of people with disabilities, their families, and service providers in their latest COVID-19 relief deal,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

The Money Follows the Person (MFP) program provides states with 100% federal Medicaid funding for one year to transition people out of institutions and nursing homes, and back to their communities. MFP has moved more than 105,000 seniors and individuals with disabilities out of these institutions, and has helped 44 states improve access to home and community-based services (HCBS). Medicaid requires states to provide care in nursing homes, but HCBS is optional. The MFP program is then critical because it incentivizes investment in HCBS by providing federal funding for transitional services for individuals who wish to leave a nursing home or other institution.

The MFP program supports people to move back home by providing necessary community-based supports like staff to support individuals in their homes, home modifications, and HCBS. The program is also cost-saving for states – longitudinal studies of the program show  20% savings per beneficiary per month for state Medicaid programs and most importantly, better quality of life outcomes for people receiving services in the community instead of institutional care.

“This program will make it possible for more people with disabilities to change their lives, on their own terms. We’ve got a lot of work to do in the new year to continue to help people with disabilities to live in safer settings with the right services for each individual, and the necessary resources for the dedicated staff supporting them. Families are struggling too, and The Arc will continue to lead this fight for equality and justice during and after this public health crisis,” said Berns.

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Shut Out Again: COVID-19 Relief Package Again Excludes Needs of People With Disabilities, Families, Service Providers

After months of hardship and danger from the COVID-19 pandemic, and relentless advocacy by The Arc and advocates across the country, last night Congress passed a COVID-19 relief package without critical funding for people with disabilities to access the services and supports necessary for a life in the community.

As COVID-19 continues to spread nationwide, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are struggling to access the services they need to continue to live in the community, and their families struggle with balancing work and caregiving responsibilities. Congress should have allocated desperately needed funds to support home and community-based services but they fell short.  They also failed to provide funding for personal protective equipment (PPE) and resources for the workforce that has supported people with disabilities tirelessly throughout this pandemic.

Congress did authorize a second round of smaller stimulus payments, but once again left out many people with disabilities – those who are defined by the IRS to be “adult dependents.” This group was inexplicably cast aside despite bipartisan support for including them.

Congress extended tax credits available for business to cover paid leave, but eliminated rules about when business must provide leave and did not extend the tax credits to cover all caregivers as the pandemic continues. Congress also failed to provide a solution to a COVID-related overpayment issue with Social Security benefits. The needs of people with disabilities, their families, and the workforce that supports them were excluded to honor an arbitrary bottom line.

“It’s unconscionable that Congress ignored the dire needs of people with disabilities, their support staff, and families as this pandemic rages across the country. For months, our leaders have known the consequences of their inaction. People with disabilities are getting infected at higher rates. Support staff are putting their lives on the line day and day out with the protection they need. And families are struggling with it all. Yet in the waning days of 2020, they have shut us out in the cold in COVID-19 relief legislation,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

Home and community-based services, or HCBS, make life in the community possible for millions of people with disabilities who often need help with things like eating, dressing, personal hygiene, and managing health care or finances. As COVID-19 spread in congregate settings out of the community, like nursing homes and institutions, HCBS became even more important for health, safety, and independence. Without this critical federal emergency funding, as state budgets continue to take hits due to the pandemic, the HCBS systems will be hit hard.

Through The Arc, almost 150,000 calls and emails have flooded Congress in recent months to demand action for funding for these services, along with the PPE needed by staff to safely deliver these services to people with disabilities. Chapters of The Arc across the country have been scrambling throughout the pandemic to access PPE and other medical supplies. They are in need of resources to cover these costs as well as the funding to pay their direct support professionals fairly for the vital work they do.

“This is not hyperbole – this is life and death for people with disabilities and their support systems. Before, during, and someday after the pandemic, a life in the community is vital for people with disabilities. Congress turned its back on desperately needed funds to support these services, protect the staff doing the work, and pay them for the risks they are taking in this public health crisis,” said Berns.

Click Here for Inclusion: Staying Connected During COVID-19

For people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD), a fully integrated life in the community often depends on not only people-powered supports like direct support professionals and job coaches, but on the technology to facilitate skill building, social connection, and much more.

As the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world and shut down entire communities, people with disabilities saw many of those connections and daily routines come screeching to a halt.

Seeing the desperate need for solutions, Comcast NBCUniversal stepped up to quickly provide support where it was needed most. Comcast generously provided grants with flexibility so chapters of The Arc could make the most impact in their fight to safely prevent isolation and support overburdened families. This allowed our chapters to explore new and innovative ways to engage families in the community, at times reaching more people than in the past.

In Larimer County, Colorado, Sam and his mother found themselves stuck at home together and sharing her work laptop. Sam was able to use the laptop for high school classes and his social life—but because his mom also needed it for work, his usage was limited. On top of that, he was not able to download everything he needed for school. The other devices in the house were either no longer able to connect to the internet, out of storage, or not exclusively his. The lack of access prevented him from participating in Zoom calls with his fellow high school classmates and put him behind not only socially but academically. Sam and his mom felt frustrated and left behind, as so many others have during this pandemic.

Through the support of Comcast NBCUniversal, The Arc of Larimer County was able to help Sam and his mother by providing Sam his own new laptop to use however and whenever he wanted. He was finally able to reconnect with his friends virtually and have a sense of independence with having something of his own, giving him something positive as he toughs out the continued isolation wrought by COVID-19.

And Sam’s not the only one thrilled with his new computer! His mom says, “This will be a great stress relief, an answer to prayers. We have been actively looking and trying to make do with my work computer and the one we have to return. Thank you so much for helping our family in this tough time.”          

On the East Coast in Philadelphia, Eloisa Maglaya found herself facing the same challenges. Prior to COVID-19, she was very active in the community and enjoyed attending a variety of events. But once she was home with few options to safely socialize and stay active, she found herself feeling isolated and frustrated. This all changed with the tablet given to her by The Arc of Philadelphia. With her new tablet, she is able to:

  • Maintain a daily routine
  • Stream virtual Zumba classes (her favorite pre-pandemic activity) and stay active
  • Watch movies in her native Tagalog Philippine language
  • Learn how to navigate app usage directions, stream her favorite videos, and better use the device features with the help of her direct support professional
  • Stay updated on COVID-19 safety procedures 

The positive effects of Eloisa’s tablet have been immeasurable. Her family and The Arc’s staff have reported seeing her more joyous and happier!

Comcast NBCUniversal’s support extends far beyond chapter funding. They are leveraging their media platforms to raise public awareness of the impacts of the pandemic on people with IDD—including through multiple segments on the TODAY Show, expanding internet access to low-income families and school districts through Internet Essentials, and advancing accessibility with technology like the voice-activated remote control, X1 eye control, and a dedicated service center for customers with disabilities.

In our hyper-connected world, technology was already what kept us connected from day to day. But as we limit physical contact to stay safe, digital access has become more vital than ever. For people with IDD—who have had to fight for decades for the chance to be included in their communities—access to the digital world ensures that progress is not lost and they can remain connected and engaged with the people and activities they love most.

These grants and more are made possible by:

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