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Paid Leave for Federal Workers Approved by Congress – But Falls Short for Disability Community

Washington, D.C. – This week, Congress approved 12 weeks paid parental leave for federal workers caring for newborns, newly adopted children, and foster children, but the benefit falls short. Federal employees with disabilities and their family members need paid time off for their own medical needs and for caregiving for reasons beyond welcoming a new child and we are disappointed that the country’s largest employer now has a paid leave policy that does not include these crucial components.

“We are somewhat encouraged to see Congress take a small step in the right direction, but this paid parental leave policy is not enough. We need comprehensive paid leave for everyone that works for everyone, including people with disabilities and their families. We will continue to advocate for the needs of the disability community in paid leave – Congress can and should do more,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

In the U.S. workforce, only 1 in 6 workers has access to paid family leave to care for a family member with a serious health condition. Roughly 2 in 5 workers report they lack access to any paid leave. People with disabilities and their families often experience greater financial insecurity and are more likely to face barriers to employment that can render the financial impact of unpaid time off particularly devastating.

Comprehensive paid leave increases opportunities to take time off for a serious medical condition or to care for someone with a serious medical condition without seeing a sharp drop in income or putting one’s job or employer-based health insurance at risk. In addition, it can increase access to preventive care, such as going to doctor’s appointments, and lead to better overall health and well-being. Access to paid family and medical leave can help workers balance their personal care needs while working and providing support to a family member.

“Our expectation is that the federal government set the tone for other employers to enact paid leave policies that work for everyone. We will keeping fighting on this issue so that workers with disabilities and families that include people with disabilities one day have the comprehensive leave they need to contribute in the workforce and take care of their families,” said Berns.

The Arc has cultivated several national partnerships to bring the issue of paid family and medical leave further into the public spotlight and advocate on the federal level. Learn more about our work.

The Arc advocates for and serves people wit­­h intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 600 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.